Happy Hyena Hordes

A depository of casual fun stuff.

Spiderwoman redrawn @ TheMarySue.com

comicartcorrections:

So this talented asshole basically did my job for me.  ;)  (That’s an Australian way of saying, “What an incredible job they did!”, it’s our humour). 

I’ll still do a redraw, though, cause I’m itching to get my hands on that shit.

But DO check out that link, it really does do a great job of pulling apart the poses.

betamourne:

I’m real happy for the male night elves and imma letchu finish but have you met my monk?

She looks awesome! Maaan, I might have to dust off my own tauren lady. Or reroll her on my current server. :)

bombshellart:

Zanz died a big, beefy, egotistical, charming scumbag. Now he’s a lanky, thin, still mildly egotistical, awkward nerd. Funny what 20+ years of undeath does to a guy.

bombshellart:

Zanz died a big, beefy, egotistical, charming scumbag. Now he’s a lanky, thin, still mildly egotistical, awkward nerd. Funny what 20+ years of undeath does to a guy.

(via frostbitch)

Male tauren are about eight feet tall, or so I’m told.
Therefore, this bird is way too big. This bird is reDONKulously big. It is SILLY how big this bird is.

Male tauren are about eight feet tall, or so I’m told.

Therefore, this bird is way too big. This bird is reDONKulously big. It is SILLY how big this bird is.

spellcaster-queen-selene:

Remember that movie in which Jack Black was a teacher and building a rock band and when a little black chubby girl asked to be a singer he only said “sure! let me hear you” and the moment she started using her beautiful voice his lit up like all of his dreams came true, PLUS the same little girl was scared that people would make fun of her because she was fat and he started listing awesome singers with some weight on and included himself and told her that people wouldn’t laugh because she is awesome at what she does and that is all that matters PLUS that it’s ok to enjoy food?

Also, when a little boy asked to be the band’s stylist he just said “sure, go ahead fancy pants” like, there wasn’t a single second of questioning it, he went into “ok, that will be your position then” right away

That fucking movie is an hour and a half of Jack Black teaching kids to love themselves disregarding all of the stereotypes

(Source: selene-the-dragon-princess, via samanthajmathis)

uzlolzu:

A practice thing~

Martin (freckles) belongs to xhakhal
Jasper is mine.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

(via rendigo)

makanidotdot:

people were drawing ursula today for the twitter thing.  i love ursula and i love impractical fantasy armor and weapons wanna fight about it

makanidotdot:

people were drawing ursula today for the twitter thing.  i love ursula and i love impractical fantasy armor and weapons wanna fight about it

(via ktshy)